Hi Friends,

Even as I launch this today ( my 80th Birthday ), I realize that there is yet so much to say and do.

There is just no time to look back, no time to wonder,"Will anyone read these pages?"

With regards,
Hemen Parekh
27 June 2013

Friday, 28 March 2014

KAUN BANEGA BHAGYASHALI


1.CONCEPT                                                               

2.PARTNER                                                                


                                                             
                                                    
5.THE PROCESS                                                          

6.PROCESS COMPARISON                                              

7.LAUNCH STRATEGY                                                 

8.PLACEMENT REVENUE                                               

9.WHY WOULD CORPORATES PATRONISE KBB ?                                

10.OBILIGATION OF PARTICIPATING CORPORATES                      

11.SELECTION OF CORPORATE- RECRUITERS                            

12.WHY WOULD JOB SEEKERS FLOCK TO KBB ?                       

13.ANONYMITY OF JOBSEEKERS                                         

14.WHY WOULD ADVERTISERS’ QUEUE-UP FOR KBB ?               

15.SHARED BELIEFS                                                        

16.PRINCIPLES                                                             

18.INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS                                     

18.KBC VS KBB                                                          



INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS


It is clearly understood & accepted by the partners that, 3P is, the owner of the following intellectual properties
Ø  The concept underlying utilization of multimedia convergence (TV channel & Internet jobsite) for carrying-out online and publicity visible/transparent, headhunt, headhunting on participating jobseekers’ resume database, hosted on the jobsite.
This concept also covers incorporation of other media into such a multimedia convergence. A few examples of such media are :
-      Newspapers / Magazines / any print media
-      Telecommunications Systems (fixed lines/mobile/paging/WILL etc)
-      Radio / Wireless Communications
The important elements of this concept are
-      Creation of database on websites
-      Online search/retrieval of such database for the purpose of “match-making” between a “buyer” and a “seller” of goods / services
-      Use of TV and other media to enhance buyer / seller participation and interaction
-      Audience / Viewer participation in the process of “buying / selling / match-making” of goods / services. Such participation could be “ on-the–spot” thru physical presence on the TV show/program, or it could be “remote”, thru use of phone or remotely logging onto the computer server hosting the database.
Ø  The resume database / job databases existing on www.3pjobs.com at the beginning of this partnership / association / joint venture / co-branding arrangement or similar / same type of database created on www.3pjobs.com during the course of this partnership / association / joint venture.
Ø  Various forms and search engines and software programs created / likely to be created on www.3pjobs.com
Ø  Website domain names as follows

it is clearly understood and accepted by the parties that the use of the above-mentioned intellectual properties by the TV channel partner shall be restricted to
-      The TV program KBB only
-      The duration of the MoU /Agreement entered into between the TV channel and 3P
Any expansion / extension to the use of these intellectual properties, of 3P by the TV channel partner shall be only with express / written permission of 3 P, obtained in advance.
The TV channel undertakes to cease/desist from using 3P’s intellectual properties, as soon as this MoU / agreement / joint venture comes to an end, either naturally or thru termination of the agreement.

WEB ACTIVATED RECRUITMENT PROCESS


-WARP
Hemen Parek
Although internet itself is more than two decades old. World Wide Web (www) is a recent phenomenon, especially in India. Americans were the first to realize the importance of internet as a powerful media of communication and advertising. It was not merely “product – advertising” but it encompassed advertising for “services” and for creating a “corporate image”.
The Corporate sector which was one of the earliest to jump onto the internet bandwagon was the “services” sectors, whether it was travel & tourism, airlines, hotels, financial services etc. Not to be left-out were the head-hunters!
To-day, there are over 5000 websites offering on-line placement services. The big daddies amongst these are :
www.careerbuilder.com                            www.careermosaic.com
www.careerpath.com                               www.execunet.com
www.hotjobs.com                                    www.monster.com
All of the above are American websites. As far as the job hunt / head hunt related Indian Websites are concerned, there  are 100 of them ! Amongst these, some of the most popular are:
www.3p-jobsearch.com                              www.timesjobandcareers.com
www.naukri.com                                        www.employindia.com
www.smartindia.com                                  www.tvijobs.com
www.smartindia.com                                  www.winjobs.com
www.jobsweb.com                                      www.placementindia.com
www.sampooma.com                                  www.careerindia.com
www.braintrustindia.com                             www.ciol.com
Although most of these websites have come-up during the last 2 years, the services offered by these vary widely. All of these sites offer the following basic services:
For The Job-Seekers
Most websites provide two basic services to jobseekers. These are:
Annexure XII(Contd)    
(A)        Posting the resume
However, the questions that a prospective jobseeker might want to ask here are:
-      Can I submit my resume online or do I need to sent it to the site by snail-mail and thereafter they will (at some unspecified future date) upload it on their website? Will the website assure me total anonymity, by hiding my name and contact information (address/phone no. etc) or can this be seen/ viewed by any headhunters? Will my name get replaced by a unique Code No. which is ailoted to me online the moment I submit my resume? Can my boss findout that it is my resume?
-      Will the website reveal my identity to a prospective employer (headhunter) without my permission?
-      The moment I submit my resume online, does it form part of a “searchable database”? Can I myself decide / specify the parameters under which I would like myself to be searched ? – parameters such as Industry / Function / Designation / Educational Qualification / Posting City preference / Age / Experience / Salary etc. At a future date, if I want to delet / modify my search-parameters, can I do this online on my own ? To do this, will I be ailoted a secrets password / user ID ?
-      In case, my resume gets short-listed by a headhunter, will I receive an intimation from the website?
-      If I want my resume to be forewarded against a specific job-advt posted on the website, will the website undertake to do this?
-      If I do not wish to log onto the website every evening to find out if some new interesting jobs have been uploaded, does the website have a feature whereby I submit my “job-search criteria” only once and whereafter the website will, on its own, keep track of all matching jobs being uploaded / posted and keep me informed ?
(B)        Searchable Database of Job-Advts
Most website boast of a job-advts. Generally these are “posted” by Corporates. Some websites also scan the job-advt which appear in print-media and upload on their sites.
But in most cases, this a simple listing thru which a job-seeker must carefully-and patiently – plod through, till he comes across an advt that interest him. This process is no different than going thru job-advt / appointments section of a newspaper, and may take hours if one has to even cursorily glance at 500 job-advts which may be listed on the website ! Not a satisfactory solution from the jobseeker’s view point although with each jobseekers clicking 500 times, it certainly helps a website to claim that it gets “thousands of hits” everyday !
Once again the question that a jobseeker might want to ask is,
“is the job-advt. database searchable within seconds – by simply entering my “ job-search criteria” such as Industry / Function / Designation level / Posted City Preference etc. and clicking only once?”

For The Headhunters
Most websites provide two basic services to the HR/ Personnel Managers, These are :
(A)        Job-Advt Posting
Although all websites allow Personnel Chiefs to post their job-advts on their site, almost all (except one or two) charge a fee. Of course, the fees are very competitive as compared to the cost of print-media.
However, questions that a Personnel Manager ought to ask are :
-      Can I post my job-advt on-line on my own, directly and without any intervention from the website or do I have to fax them a copy which they will upload after a few days ?
-      If I am allowed to post it online, will it appear instantly and can it be seen by jobseekers around the World from the moment I click on “submit” button?
-      Do I get any feedback from the site, as to how many potential candidates have “viewed” my advt / Is there a counter against my advt that will tell me this?    
-      Will I get the candidate – response directly, without any intervention of the website?
-      Will the response mention ”Advt. No.”, so that it gets automatically segregated/

(B)        Executive-Searching From Resume Database (Head Hunting)
Most websites have an online resume database – however, in most cases, this database is not truely “searchable”- within seconds – by using search-parameters (filters) such as Industry / Designation / Function / Edu. Qualification / Age (yrs) / Experience (yrs) / Current city location etc.
In the absence of a well-defined filtering process, where you can apply the chosen filters simultaneously or sequentially (one by one), searching for your “Man Friday” from amongst 30,000 or 50,000 resumes, resembles the proverbial Need in the Haystack situation ! You might as well be reading typed resumes received thru snail-mail-unless you like to get hypnotized with the sound of 10,000 mouse-clicks !
If the website does offer some kind of a “filtering” process, the next thing a Personnel Manager might want to know is,
Annexure XII (Contd)
“Can I, create on-line, a shopping basket, fill it with the resumes of the short-listed candidates and instantly (of course electronically ) foreward to the website concerned, to take further action?”
Apart from the foregoing main services offered by most websites, there are a few websites which offer one or more of the following features:
-      Compensation Surveys
-      Labour Laws
-      Career – Counseling / Interview tips
-      Industry Profiles
-      Salary Comparison
-      Statutory Returns be filed
-      Corporate Profiles
-      Educational Institutions Database etc

Most of these features are of interest not only to the job-seekers and the Personnel Managers, but also to a wide variety of executives. They would like to return to their favourite site again and again. However, before placing a book-mark on a particular site, based on various features described earlier, a Personnel manager should also the following questions:
-      Is the site-content relevant to my profession ?
-      Does the content help me with the qualify of my decisions ? Does it help improve
My personal performance and productivity ?
-      How interactive is the site ?
-      What is the traffic on the site ?
-      How do leading search-engines rank the site on keyword such as jobs hunt and headhunt ?
At this point, a Personnel Manager is quite likely to throw-up his hands and say, “ Hey!
Hold it ! Hold it for a second ! What is in it for me ? How does it help me ?” That would be a natural reaction ! If I were to say,
“Cut your average recruitment-cycle time from 6 months to 2 months by getting web-sawy”,
How would that sound ? Too good to be true ?
The non-believers may wish to take a close look at Fig. 1 (Recruitment during the dark-ages of pre-intemet era). If I have left-out any activity from this process-flow-chart, feel free to add. Then estimate “average” time it would take to completer each activity. (You already know that all the activities are “sequential- there are no”parallel” process-hence every activity lies on the “Critical Path” of  PERT diagram). Add-up the activitity-times.


 Annexure XII (Concld)
Now turn to
Fig # 2 (Post yourjob-advt. on a website)
Fig # 3 (Conduct an online head hunt on a website)
And repeat the entire process of estimating “average activity time” for both these charts and add-up.
If you were to repear this process for the “actual time taken” to fill the next 50 vacancies in your Organisation and then plot a frequency-distribution diagram, it will most likely look like the top curve on Fig.4 (Frequency Distribution Diagrams for pre-intemet and post-inernet recruitment processes).
Then compare it with the middle and the bottom curves.
When you do, you know what is in it for you. If these three curves cannot convince you to switch-over to the far more attractive

Web-Activated Recruitment Process (WARP),
Nothing else will.




KAUN BANEGA… WILL SHAKE UP TV INDUSTRY


AFTER quite a while, a television programme appears to have caught the Indian viewer’s imagination. Kaun Banega Crorepati (KBC), the Indian version of an international favorite anchored by the legendary Amitabh Bachchan airs Mondays to Thursdays at 9 pm on Star Plus. Not only has the programmed managed to garner a large chunk of audience share, but it has also set into motion a new dynamics which is going to alter the entire spectrum of the Indian television industry. Even as we usher in the new convergent era, traditional broadcasting is shifting gears. Its going to be one roller-coaster ride for all the players and the queasy and weak-hearted are not going to survive.
Ten years down the line since satellite TV first  tested the supremacy of Doordarshan, a new threshold level is emerging in the business. As the number of channels proliferates, there is not just the fight for bandwidth but also for viewership. Quite like the Mobius strip, no one is sure where carriage and content merge. However, we are witnessing a new consolidation phase which will see a shake-out, in the channel space with stakes raised much higher. Cable connectivity is expected to reach 40m homes at end of this year. This means one out of every two TV homes will have access to satellite channels.  Yet again, the viewer is becoming more discerning and picking and choosing her fare from a well spread buffet of programming.
Let’s look at the increase of regional language channels. Tamil has 7, Bangla 5, Marathi 5, Gujarati 5, Telugu 4 and so on . Many of these are backed by large media companies with deep pockets so they have the staying power. But almost all are clones of each other. What this result in is that there is hardly any channel loyalty amongst viewers even within the same ethnocentric or linguistic groups. As people surf from one to another in the seamless channel space, it is individual programmes which become critical both for the channel as well as the advertiser. The only constant channel drivers seem to be films but given the hunger of the medium, there are not enough films to go around. While film producer are suddenly discovering that there is a lot of moolah to be made on the box, channel owners are finding it hard to get films.
While mythologicals still rule the roost as far as serials go, afternoon soaps to seem to be the sine qua non of Indian TV channels. Unfortunately, there is little path-breaking writing to bolster sagging storylines of most drama series.
If you look at the fixed point charts of various channels you will find that it is old programmes like Amaanat, Hum Panch, Ashirwaad on Zeee, CID, Heena on Sony, Saans on Star – which are still top-of-the charts. When Prannoy Roy started his newscasts, Ramanand Sagar and BR Chopra Ramayan and Mahabharat. Rajat Sharma his Adalat,Gajendra Singh his Antaakshari or Plus Channel and UTV their daily soaps Swabhimaan and Shanti, there was some innovation. Now e whole scenario is imitative. More of the same. You have the same actors, the same anchors mouthing similar lines in similar programmes across channels, sometimes even across languages.
While there has been an occasional attempt at creating new genres of programming—
Investigative dramas’ like Bhanwar, Indis’s Most Wanted, Agnichkra and so on – most producers and channel managers have been far from adventurous.
Programme fatigue is setting in fast. Even as channels push producers to up  technical quality and production design the content is hardly upgraded. Once broadband comes in, the viewer is going to demand quality as the choice becomes varied – from a buffet we will move to a la carte.
KBC has proved a point. You take a global format, Indianise it using a local format, take a high profile movie star and you have a winner. What it has also done is raise the marketing of TV shows to dizzy heights and introduced big time prize money on Indian TV. It is no longer going to be possible to launch a major show without all the hoopla and hype one normally associates with mega movies. And Amitabh Bachchan may have started another trend – of getting superstars on to the tube. You can expect a lot of glamour on the box in the months  to come.
What KBC has also done is usher in a rudimentary form of interactivity on Indian television. Passive viewing will soon be passé. You will see a lot of shows which will invite viewer participation. Actually, whenever the viewer has been egged on in a programme, it has always been a success. So, while the creative teams at various channels put on their thinking caps, the viewer can rest assured that consumer is always king.
One heartening thing for the TV industry is that ad spends are going up exponentially and for the first time substantial income from. Subscription, is looking a reality, Yes, the next round of TV games has begun. And the prize money is big. But unfortunately, the game is quite like Russian roulette. Either you win or you are dead. This is something the Star TV guys must be as aware of as their beleaguered competitors. Kaun Banega Crorepati?

STATISTIC


A.               POPULATION                                         Annexure
Ø  Urban Population Scenario                           IX (A1)
Ø  Labour Force : 1980 – 2000                         IX (A2)

B.            EMPLOYMENT EXCHANGES
Ø  Statistics                                                     IX (B1)
Ø  How did they help?                                       IX (B2)

C.            EMPLOYMENT
Ø  Production & Employment                             IX (C1)
(Small- scale sector)
Ø  Employment in organized sector                    IX (C2)
Ø  Employment in Public & private sector            IX (C3)       

D.             SCHOOLS & COLLEGES                               IX (D1)
SOURCES:
Ø  CII Handbook of Statistics : 1997
Ø  Statistical Outline of India : 1997
Ø  News-reports


Annexure IX (A1)
Urban Population Scenario (1991)

No. of Urban Agglomeration / Towns______3,768

Urban Population_____________________ 217.6
Millions

Urban Population               217.6
______________   =       _______          25.7%
 
Total Population                 846


Percentage Of Towns

Types of Towns

% in total towns
Class I Towns (> 1 lakh)

8.2%
II Towns (50 K--- 100 K)

9.5%
III Towns (20 K ---50 K)

25.7%
IV Towns ( 10 K--- 20 K)

31.4%


Percentage Of Urban Population In.

Types of Towns

% Of Urban Population in
Class I

65.2%
II

10.9%
III

13.2%
IV

7.8%

Annexure IX (A2)
Labour Force : 1980-2000

S.No

Category
1980
1985
1990
2000
A.
1. Rural Male

2. Rural Female

128.53

57.73
142.61

64.18
157.43

71.18
181.32

83.01

Total Rural

186.26
206.79
228.61
264.33
B.
1. Urban Male

2. Urban Female

41.71

9.71
51.00

12.02
62.48

14.99
92.86

22.66

Total Urban

51.42
63.02
77.47
115.52
C.
Total Male

170.24
193.61
219.91
274.18
D.
Total Female

67.44
76.20
86.17
105.67

All India

237.68
269.81
306.08
379.85


Source :Seventh Plan 1985-90 (Government of India)

Annexure IX (B1)
Employment Exchange Statistics
(in lakhs)


Applicants on Live Register
No. of New Registration
Placements affected
(3) as % of (1)
(3) as % of (2)

(1)
(2)
(3)


1985-86
1991-92
1992-93
1993-94
1994-95
1995-96
1996-97
1997-98
1998-99
1999-2000

270
365
363
360
366
368
376
380
57
61
51
57
59
59
59
15
13.5
15.2
3.73
2.59
2.29
2.16
2.12
2.19
2.52
0.62
0.53
0.53
1.38
0.71
0.63
0.60
0.58
0.59
0.67
0.16
6.54
4.25
4.49
3.79
3.59
3.71
4.27
4.13
3.93
3.52

June 98

June 98

395

406






Source: Monthly Economic Report (Labour Ministry)

Annexure IX (B2)

How Much Did Employment Exchanges Help
Educated Job Seekers?


(millions)


Education
Level




Registrations

Placements


1992

1993

1994
(Jan-June)

1992
1993



1994
(Jan-June)



Matriculates


Above Metric but below degree


Graduates & Post Graduates
                        


2.29


0.90



0.68


2.11


0.92



0.63



0.97


0.44



0.33



0.06


0.03



0.04



0.043


0.021



0.031


0.024


0.009



0.013


TOTAL

3.88

3.66

7.75

0.13

0.095

0.046


Annexure IX (C1)

Production and Employment
(Small Scale Sector)

Year

No. of units registered
(lakhs)
Production  (rs. Crores)

Employment  (lakh persons)
Remark



1995-96

27.24


316,421

152.61

Provisional Figures


1996-97

29.14

340,564

158.91

Anticipated Figures

Annexure IX (C2)
Employment in the Organised Sector
(March 1996)


Sector

Employment (millions)

% change over previous year

Public Sectors

Private Sectors

19.43

8.51

-0.27

+5.58
         
              TOTAL

27.94

+1.49



Annexure IX (C3)
Employment in Public and Private Sectors as on
March ‘96

                                                           (lakhs)

S.No



Industry



Public Sectors


Private Sectors



Total






















1.


Agriculture


5.4

9.2

14.6

2.

Mining & Quarrying


9.9

1.1

11.0

3.

Manufacturing

17.40

50.50

67.90

4.

Construction

11.60

0.50

12.10

5.

Electricity

9.50

0.40

9.90

6.

Wholesale & Retail Trade

1.60

3.20

4.80

7.
Transport/communication & storage
30.90
0.60
31.50

8.
Finance/Insurance/Real Estate
12.80
3.10
15.90

9.
Community/Social & personal
95.20
16.60
111.80



TOTAL

194.30

85.10

279.40



Annexure IX (D1)
Schools & Colleges (for year 1995-96)

Level

No. of Institutions
Enrollment (Million)
Primary

590,400
109.8
Middle

171,200
41.0
Higher Secondary

98,100
24.9
General Education Colleges

6,569

Professional Colleges

1,354

Universities

226


·         Medical + Eng. + Teachers Trg. Colleges only.A.               POPULATION                                         Annexure
Ø  Urban Population Scenario                           IX (A1)
Ø  Labour Force : 1980 – 2000                         IX (A2)

B.            EMPLOYMENT EXCHANGES
Ø  Statistics                                                     IX (B1)
Ø  How did they help?                                       IX (B2)

C.            EMPLOYMENT
Ø  Production & Employment                             IX (C1)
(Small- scale sector)
Ø  Employment in organized sector                    IX (C2)
Ø  Employment in Public & private sector            IX (C3)       

D.             SCHOOLS & COLLEGES                               IX (D1)
SOURCES:
Ø  CII Handbook of Statistics : 1997
Ø  Statistical Outline of India : 1997
Ø  News-reports


Annexure IX (A1)
Urban Population Scenario (1991)

No. of Urban Agglomeration / Towns______3,768

Urban Population_____________________ 217.6
Millions

Urban Population               217.6
______________   =       _______          25.7%
 
Total Population                 846


Percentage Of Towns

Types of Towns

% in total towns
Class I Towns (> 1 lakh)

8.2%
II Towns (50 K--- 100 K)

9.5%
III Towns (20 K ---50 K)

25.7%
IV Towns ( 10 K--- 20 K)

31.4%


Percentage Of Urban Population In.

Types of Towns

% Of Urban Population in
Class I

65.2%
II

10.9%
III

13.2%
IV

7.8%

Annexure IX (A2)
Labour Force : 1980-2000

S.No

Category
1980
1985
1990
2000
A.
1. Rural Male

2. Rural Female

128.53

57.73
142.61

64.18
157.43

71.18
181.32

83.01

Total Rural

186.26
206.79
228.61
264.33
B.
1. Urban Male

2. Urban Female

41.71

9.71
51.00

12.02
62.48

14.99
92.86

22.66

Total Urban

51.42
63.02
77.47
115.52
C.
Total Male

170.24
193.61
219.91
274.18
D.
Total Female

67.44
76.20
86.17
105.67

All India

237.68
269.81
306.08
379.85


Source :Seventh Plan 1985-90 (Government of India)

Annexure IX (B1)
Employment Exchange Statistics
(in lakhs)


Applicants on Live Register
No. of New Registration
Placements affected
(3) as % of (1)
(3) as % of (2)

(1)
(2)
(3)


1985-86
1991-92
1992-93
1993-94
1994-95
1995-96
1996-97
1997-98
1998-99
1999-2000

270
365
363
360
366
368
376
380
57
61
51
57
59
59
59
15
13.5
15.2
3.73
2.59
2.29
2.16
2.12
2.19
2.52
0.62
0.53
0.53
1.38
0.71
0.63
0.60
0.58
0.59
0.67
0.16
6.54
4.25
4.49
3.79
3.59
3.71
4.27
4.13
3.93
3.52

June 98

June 98

395

406






Source: Monthly Economic Report (Labour Ministry)

Annexure IX (B2)

How Much Did Employment Exchanges Help
Educated Job Seekers?


(millions)


Education
Level




Registrations

Placements


1992

1993

1994
(Jan-June)

1992
1993



1994
(Jan-June)



Matriculates


Above Metric but below degree


Graduates & Post Graduates
                        


2.29


0.90



0.68


2.11


0.92



0.63



0.97


0.44



0.33



0.06


0.03



0.04



0.043


0.021



0.031


0.024


0.009



0.013


TOTAL

3.88

3.66

7.75

0.13

0.095

0.046


Annexure IX (C1)

Production and Employment
(Small Scale Sector)

Year

No. of units registered
(lakhs)
Production  (rs. Crores)

Employment  (lakh persons)
Remark



1995-96

27.24


316,421

152.61

Provisional Figures


1996-97

29.14

340,564

158.91

Anticipated Figures

Annexure IX (C2)
Employment in the Organised Sector
(March 1996)


Sector

Employment (millions)

% change over previous year

Public Sectors

Private Sectors

19.43

8.51

-0.27

+5.58
         
              TOTAL

27.94

+1.49



Annexure IX (C3)
Employment in Public and Private Sectors as on
March ‘96

                                                           (lakhs)

S.No



Industry



Public Sectors


Private Sectors



Total






















1.


Agriculture


5.4

9.2

14.6

2.

Mining & Quarrying


9.9

1.1

11.0

3.

Manufacturing

17.40

50.50

67.90

4.

Construction

11.60

0.50

12.10

5.

Electricity

9.50

0.40

9.90

6.

Wholesale & Retail Trade

1.60

3.20

4.80

7.
Transport/communication & storage
30.90
0.60
31.50

8.
Finance/Insurance/Real Estate
12.80
3.10
15.90

9.
Community/Social & personal
95.20
16.60
111.80



TOTAL

194.30

85.10

279.40



Annexure IX (D1)
Schools & Colleges (for year 1995-96)

Level

No. of Institutions
Enrollment (Million)
Primary

590,400
109.8
Middle

171,200
41.0
Higher Secondary

98,100
24.9
General Education Colleges

6,569

Professional Colleges

1,354

Universities

226


·         Medical + Eng. + Teachers Trg. Colleges only.